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Gutter Repair Plainfield IL
(ROOF REPAIR-GUTTER REPAIR-SIDING REPAIR-SOFFIT REPAIR-GUTTER CLEANING-DOWNSPOUT REPAIR-OVERSIZED GUTTER INSTALL-FLASHING REPAIR-CHIMNEY REPAIR-.) 

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Repair Siding: Use a Kick-Out Flashing to Stop Rot
Install this special flashing to stop or prevent rot
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Sidewalls, where a roof abuts a wall, are potential leak spots and rot spots. Good metal flashing prevents these problems, including a specially shaped “kick-flashing.”

The side wall flashing problem and solution


Common rot spot

The intersection between a roof and a sidewall can be a rot problem waiting to happen. Even if the roof has been properly flashed against the sidewall (this one hasn't), water can still run down the side of the house and behind the siding, causing rot.

The solution to rotting sidewalls is a small piece of bent metal called a kick-out flashing (at roofing suppliers), which simply directs all that water away from the wall. It installs just like standard step flashing, except that half of it hangs over the edge of the roof.

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Install the flashing


Photo 1: Slip in the flashing

Lift the bottom shingle and slip in the kick-out flashing. Nail it to the sidewall (or glue it if nailing isn't possible).

Inspect the sidewall around and underneath the fascia and inside the house for signs of moisture damage, and repair any rotted areas. Add felt, if needed, before nailing the new wood on, and prime the new wood on all four sides before installing it.

Install the kick-out flashing underneath the first shingle (Photo 1). If the shingle already has flashing on it, the kick-out flashing has to slip beneath it, and you'll have to loosen or remove siding to do this. If the sidewall is stucco or solid wood like ours and you can't open it to get flashing behind it, continue the step flashing to the peak of the roof, then cover the step flashing with cap flashing (Photo 2).
Repair larger holes in gutters by covering them with patches. Take a sheet-metal patch, embed it in roofing cement, and then apply another coat of cement over the patch, as shown at left.

If your region delivers abundant rainfall, you may want to have your downspout run into a dry well. The well should be a hole 2 to 4 feet wide and 3 feet deep, or a 55-gallon drum—with both ends removed and filled with rocks—that you’ve buried and punctured with holes. Underground drainage pipes should slope to the dry well, which will keep water away from the house’s foundation. Check your local building codes before installing.

Overflowing Rain Gutters
Gutters that overflow can present serious problems to your home’s walls and foundation. If your gutters overflow during a heavy rain, either the gutters and/or downspouts are clogged, the gutters are sagging and thereby preventing water from reaching the downspouts, or the gutters and downspouts are not large enough to handle the volume of rain runoff.

In most cases, gutters overflow because leaves and debris are clogging them, essentially creating dams that prevent water from flowing to the outlets above the downspouts. In fact, these clogs often occur right at the outlets. When this is the case, it’s time to clean out the gutters. (For more about this, see Rain Gutter Cleaning & Maintenance.)

Gutters that sag are a different issue—and the more they fill up with water, the more likely they are to sag because they become so heavy when full. If the gutters overflow but are not sagging or clogged, you will probably need to install new, larger downspouts and gutters.

Sagging Rain Gutters
When full of water, rain gutters can become extremely heavy. As a result, the types made of flexible materials such as aluminum, vinyl, and galvanized steel can begin to bend and sag and their hangers to loosen. As this happens, they cease to do a good job of draining rainwater efficiently, allowing water to pool along their lengths. This, of course, just exacerbates the problem, making them heavier and causing them to sag even more.


To determine if your rain gutters sag, check for signs of standing water or water marks along the inner sides of the gutters. With a level, check the slope—gutters should drop about 1/4 inch for every 10 feet of run toward the downspouts.

To fix them, you may need to replace the hangers or, at the very least, re-seat them. If the gutters are held by spike-and-ferrule hangers, use a hammer to drive the long spike, making sure it goes into solid wood. If it does not grab securely, you may need to replace it with an even longer galvanized nail or, better yet, a long screw.



To tighten clip-style gutter hangers, you will need to lift the roofing material along the eaves and refasten the hangers to the sheathing. Be careful not to crack or create holes in the roofing.


Downspouts may break loose from the gutter outlet or between sections. This often happens when elbows in the sections become clogged with debris.

Take the sections apart and clean out the debris. Then, to refasten them, push the downspout sections and/or elbows together, drill pilot holes if necessary, and fasten them with two 3/8-inch #8 galvanized sheet metal screws. (Don’t use longer screws because debris will hang on them.) Be sure the anchor straps that hold the downspouts to the wall are secure.

Fasten the top downspout to the S-curve outlet with one or two screws at each joint for easy removal for regular cleaning.

Downspouts Pool Runoff Water
Automatic recoiling downspout. Courtesy Raindrain.
Raindrain
Automatic recoiling downspout.

Downspouts that dump rainwater right at the base of your exterior walls can create serious problems. As water pools and soaks into the soil, it can eventually work its way into the foundation. For this reason, it is important to direct rainwater away from the house.

The best way to do this is to use a downspout diverter. These simple devices fit onto the bottom of downspouts and, as in the case of the one shown here, unfurl to carry water several feet away from the house. Called an “automatic recoiling downspout,” it is a simple and inexpensive device.
Gutter Repair Plainfield